Voter guide

Learn more about the Mayoral candidates’ plans for ending homelessness and expanding access to truly affordable housing for all New Yorkers.

RxHome asked all of the candidates running for mayor to tell us about their plans for ending and preventing homelessness in New York City. Below are their ideas on how they will make New York City a healthier, more just city where all New Yorkers have a place to call home.

The New York City mayoral election is on June 22. Find your poll site here!

Candidate Questionnaire

RxHome reached out to all of the mayoral candidates who filed with the Campaign Finance Board to offer educational briefings about the current state of homelessness in New York City. After our initial candidate education meetings, RxHome sent a questionnaire to all of the mayoral campaigns in February 2021. The questions were designed to learn about the candidates' policy positions on preventing and ending homelessness, addressing the availability of affordable housing and structuring the leadership of city agencies that deal with homelessness and housing instability.

The following section contains the full, unedited answers that RxHome received in response to our candidate questionnaire from 9 candidates (Art Chang, Shaun Donovan, Kathryn Garcia, Chris Krietchman, Ray McGuire, Dianne Morales, Bill Pepitone, Scott Stringer, and Andrew Yang) running for mayor of New York City. For the other 9 candidates (Eric Adams, Quanda Francis, Paperboy Prince, Maya Wiley, Aaron Foldenauer, Fernando Mateo, Curtis Sliwa, Joycelyn Taylor, and Isaac Wright) who did not respond to the candidate questionnaire, we used campaign websites and public statements to provide responses, where appropriate and possible.

Dianne Morales

It’s time to get serious about ending homelessness once and for all. This year, the New York Times reported that in New York City, over 100,000 school-aged children are housing insecure. Federal data estimate about 80,000 unhoused people in the city, a figure 15,000 higher than projections from the de Blasio administration. Black and Latinx children are 15 times more likely to not have had a stable place to live in the last 12 months. Homelessness is a human rights crisis, but it is one that can be solved. Dianne’s plan includes:

Within the first 100 days, providing more secure and guaranteed pathways toward permanent residence, including the prompt conversion of hotels into permanent support housing and services for families of our 100,000 unhoused school-aged youth;

Appoint a Deputy Mayor responsible for leading and coordinating a citywide, cross-sector effort addressing housing, opportunity and social mobility, including shifting the $3 billion annual shelter budget towards preventative measures, and implementing preventative models that effectively responds to housing displacement and vulnerability;

Repurpose the Economic Development Corporation (EDC) for social-public partnerships focused on disrupting poverty from a root cause lens, prioritizing physiological needs, including the development of social housing, expansion of cooperative housing, increasing affordable housing and eradicating homelessness;

Advocate to extend rent moratorium and rollback rent to pre-pandemic rates, accounting for the hardship millions are still enduring and halting the punishing of renters by landlords and big real estate firms;

Increase the City’s rental assistance and monetary support system as well as expand eligibility criteria;

Implement performance based contracting with shelters and relief services and repurpose towards comprehensive prevention services and rehousing;

Partner with community-trusted organizations that have proven track records in responding to the needs of housing insecure communities, as well as elevate the voices of unhoused New Yorkers front and center — especially in healthcare and economic empowerment.

Kathryn Garcia

Homelessness has multiple causes, but the solution starts with housing. My plan will:

- Add 50,000 units of deeply affordable housing affordable to households making 30% of Area Median Income

- Create 10,000 units of supportive housing

- Rezone high opportunity areas to enable the construction of new affordable housing in places with good access to transit, schools, jobs, and parks

- Legalize basement apartments, accessory dwelling units, single room occupancy (SRO) housing, and multifamily housing Citywide

- Shift funding from shelter-based solutions to eviction prevention and affordable housing

- Redesign existing rental assistance, eviction prevention, and housing placement procedures with current and formerly homeless New Yorkers to humanize the process

These shifts will be accompanied by aligning responsibilities for affordable housing and homelessness under a single Deputy Mayor. We cannot have a fragmented approach to homelessness.

Quanda Francis

"I will reduce the homeless population and reduce the number of agencies that currently service the homeless population. 19 city agencies currently service the homeless population. This is wasteful spending, and it is the least efficient way to adequately service this vulnerable portion of the New York City population."

Source: Candidate website

Chris Kreitchman

After watching your presentation and reviewing more and more information, I have realized that there is a lot of corruption and we must clean out the problems by exposing them and removing them. Then I will be implementing what I've learned from your suggestions and more unconventional approaches:

"1. Commit to ending and preventing homelessness in NYC by using a housing first approach for NYC homeless services.

2. Appoint a Deputy Mayor responsible for leading the citywide cross-agency effort to end homelessness and tasked with managing all the agencies that provide housing and homeless services.

3. Implement a coordinated entry system that provides comprehensive prevention services and rehousing assistance, via performance based contracting, for all New Yorkers.

4. Amend the City rental assistance voucher rule to increase the monetary voucher amount and expand the eligibility criteria so more New Yorkers in need can access this program. Increase the supply of affordable apartments by legalizing ADUs, basement units, redeveloping City owned shelters as housing, and converting vacant as-of-right buildings into low income housing.

5. Recruit partners from healthcare, philanthropy, and business to contribute financial and strategic resources to help end homelessness in NYC."

Andrew Yang

There are far too many homeless individuals and families who live on the streets and reside in our shelters. As mayor, my anti-poverty agenda speaks directly to the core of this problem, seeking to uplift 500,000 of the City’s poorest through a basic income so that they can have a fighting chance.

We also must expand the support of deeply affordable housing. One of my administration's first housing priorities will be creating a program of forgivable grants and regulatory relief to facilitate conversions of underutilized hotel and office space to supportive and permanent affordable housing. In addition, my affordable housing plan is designed to expand the overall supply of affordable housing by allowing for the creation of microunits, accessory dwelling units, and coliving uses, which, when deeply affordable, would mainly be rented to single adults who would be the most likely to be shelters. My affordable housing plan also includes a reformed Mandatory Inclusionary Housing program which provides additional density and Floor Area Ratio (“FAR”) bonuses for the creation of deeply affordable units, some of which can be microunits.

I also understand that homelessness is the end result of the housing instability that affects millions of New Yorkers. I will prevent displacement and assist rent burdened New Yorkers through expanding the right to counsel to cover income up to 400% of the poverty line and undocumented New Yorkers, develop eviction diversion programs, and enforce the City’s source of income discrimination laws to help ensure more working families have a permanent, affordable place to live.

Bill Pepitone

We have to break the long-running cycle of placing people into shelters and walking away from the problem. To do such, we must address the root causes of homelessness; drug and alcohol abuse, mental illness, the inability to afford rent, out of work and displaced veterans., and other issues. More resources are needed for counselors and advisors who can speak to individuals or families in crisis and help address their issues before they find themselves without a home. We must be proactive as opposed to reactive, and address the cause rather than just the symptoms.

Scott Stringer

For too long we have approached homelessness and housing as separate problems, when in fact they are one and the same challenge. I’ve laid out a transformational plan to address our housing and homelessness crisis. As Mayor, I will end this siloed approach and finally tackle homelessness—by expanding our supportive housing network by an additional 30,000 beds over the next 10 years; opening up more lowbarrier, Safe Haven beds and offering housing vouchers for those living on the streets; investing in programs to prevent domestic violence, which is now the leading cause of homelessness in the city; and fundamentally changing our housing approach to build a generation of real affordable housing, targeted to low-income and extreme low-income New Yorkers, including New Yorkers experiencing homelessness.

The “housing first” model that I will champion necessitates cutting through bureaucracies and coordinating agencies. We’ve actually seen it work before, but on too small a scale. The City’s success in reducing homelessness among veterans was due in part to investing in resources by constructing affordable housing or providing vouchers; providing mentors and peers to offer support; and making placement of veterans a priority among agencies. The City must create a rapid rehousing program, that creates a priority of streamlining both supportive housing and general affordable housing placements. As Mayor, I will ensure that agencies work together to streamline the process for housing homeless individuals and families.

As a former housing organizer, I understand that the crisis of homelessness in our city is a product of decades of policy failure by all levels of government to build the housing we need. Housing is a right, not a privilege, and I’ve laid out a 27-point mayoral agenda to fight the housing crisis and end homelessness with a new generation of social housing and a Universal Affordable Housing program.

For too long, the City has created goals around the number of housing units constructed, but failed to consider the level of affordability needed, fueling speculation, gentrification and displacement across the five boroughs — but mainly, in communities of color. As mayor, I will launch a sweeping program for Universal Affordable Housing — building deeply affordable housing that low and extremely low-income New Yorkers need and can actually afford. I would also launch a new generation of social housing, harnessing the nearly 3,000 vacant lots owned by the City to build tens of thousands of new, 100% permanently affordable housing units in partnership with a new City Land Bank and community land trusts targeting the lowest income New Yorkers and those experiencing homelessness. As Mayor, I will prioritize reducing the shelter population by setting aside a minimum of 15% of all affordable housing units for those in the shelter system. My plan also includes expanding our supportive housing network by an additional 30,000 beds over the next 10 years to meet the growing need.

Most immediately, the City must ensure that permanently vacant hotels and office spaces that will not come back online after the pandemic do not get converted into luxury and market rate housing — but safe, truly affordable housing and supportive housing for homeless New Yorkers, and creating permanent homes not temporary shelter. In addition to creating at least 30,000 supportive housing beds in the next 10 years, as Mayor, I would also expand the number of low-barrier Safe Haven beds and drop-in sites, and invest in programs to prevent domestic violence, which my office has shown is the leading cause of homelessness in the city. As Mayor, I would also reform the City voucher system so that CityFHEPS vouchers reflect actual market rates and can be easily used, by both New Yorkers in shelter and those who live on the streets.

We also need to dramatically improve shelter conditions as audits from my office have exposed the deplorable conditions that can keep New Yorkers from seeking shelter in the first place.

As I’ve laid out in my office’s public safety blueprint, we need to fundamentally reimagine public safety. As mayor, I would take a multi-agency, public health-focused approach to community safety, transitioning responsibilities away from NYPD and investing in alternative responses and services. Street sweeps are inhumane and criminalize homelessness. Outreach and responses to New Yorkers experiencing homelessness and mental health or substance use challenges should be conducted by trained professionals in agencies other than the NYPD, and married with investments in long-term supports like housing, healthcare, employment services, and harm reduction.

Fernando Mateo

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Aaron Foldenauer

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Eric Adams

"We are in a homelessness crisis, and the driving factor is lack of affordable housing...Adams proposed the city provide subsidies to help homeless people move into vacant affordable units. Subsidies would have the benefit of “saving our city money and expediting the process of getting the working homeless out of the shelter system and into permanent housing,” he said."

Source: New York Daily News 3/22/2021: House city homeless in vacant apartments, says Brooklyn BP Eric Adams

Curtis Sliwa

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Isaac Wright

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Joycelyn Taylor

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Shaun Donovan

Homelessness is a solvable problem. We cannot accept the status quo nor solve homelessness with homeless programs alone. An emergency shelter system is essential for families and individuals in crisis, but the focus of past administrations has been to build a larger and larger system, draining money from permanent housing. We will spend smarter, moving our city from a right to shelter towards a right to housing, ensuring that all New Yorkers have access to the housing support they need.

We can do this by creating an improved system of emergency rental assistance and other services to help people stay housed when facing economic setbacks to avoid homelessness altogether.

We can do this by coordinating better across our own City agencies to ensure that people do not fall through the cracks but instead receive the support they need. We can do this by operating a well-run homeless system that efficiently gets people into permanent housing as quickly as possible so they can rebuild their lives.

And we can do this by maximizing all resources available from all levels of government.

We are committing to the following policies and programs:

- Invest in keeping people in their homes

- Provide appropriate housing and services

- Increase accountability and improve citywide coordination

- Protect domestic violence survivors

Maya Wiley

"In the long term, the best defense against homelessness and displacement is ensuring that New York’s housing stock is safe and truly affordable for all New Yorkers. We need to build on the success of the housing first model by moving homeless individuals to subsidized housing and then linking them to support services."

"We need a plan to:

1. Provide long-term solutions and stability instead of continuing the destabilizing pattern of providing month-by-month aid that does nothing to ease the painful psychic burden of housing uncertainty;

2. Stop New Yorkers hit by the crisis from being evicted;

3. Help small and nonprofit landlords who cannot afford to absorb the loss of nonpayments; and

4. Address the reality that many families will still fall into homelessness and require rapid relief to remain in, or return to, housing."

Source: Candidate website and Open Hearts Initiative questionnaire

Art Chang

The homeless can be housed in a sensible, safe, rational, and humane manner. To do this, I will partner with the City’s many thought leaders and practitioners to:

First, creatively think about temporary emergency housing, and consider all possible resources to bring people to safe shelter swiftly, including ensuring that all shelters are equipped with broadband access for kids in remote learning;

Then, coordinate the delivery of services for the supportive housing essential to high-need populations;

Finally, create solutions for long-term housing. The only way to accomplish this is through a major initiative to plan a massive program to build truly affordable housing.

Homelessness is driven by conditions pre-existing the onset of COVID: nearly 50% of homeless families fled domestic violence, and nearly 50% of homeless teenagers fled gender violence in their own homes. We will start treating these as the public health crises they are. I view the eviction crisis as a proxy for the size of the true need for low-income housing. By increasing the supply of housing across the board, we will achieve greater affordability for everyone.

Paperboy Prince

"Canceling rent and providing every New Yorker with 'The Freedom Dividend'-- a $1,000 monthly payment that can serve as a safety net in a time of economic uncertainty." "This money can be spent however someone would like and does not disqualify an individual from also receiving social services and benefits."

Source: Candidate website, Brooklyn Paper 2/24/2021 Paperboy Prince Wants to be the Youngest Mayor in New York City History, and The New Yorker 2/8/2021 Paperboy Prince's Platform: Cancel Rent, Abolish the Police, Legalize Psychedelics

Ray McGuire

Homelessness is a major crisis in NYC, with over 50,000 people experiencing homelessness. A majority of people living in shelters are families, and there has been a 50% increase in family homelessness in NYC since 2007, while there has been a 27% decrease nationally.

My plan focuses first and foremost on preventing people from losing their housing in the first place. I will keep those with a place to stay in their homes by providing rental subsidies, legal assistance and advocating for additional section 8 vouchers from the federal government. It’s critical that we look at existing housing stock to determine where vouchers and rental subsidies can help place people transitioning from other government programs such as the prison system, foster care and hospitalization.

Second, we need to ensure people experiencing homelessness have tailored support services. I will ensure that children and families receive childcare and access to wifi while adults receive mental health and substance abuse treatment as well as job training. We also need transitional services for those returning from prison, to ensure that they lead independent lives and can find a good job. I will leverage my management experience to simplify the bureaucracy and streamline services across agencies. We should establish expectations for service levels and outcomes and hold providers accountable and then invest in what works and scale up.

Finally, we must create a pathway to permanent housing by shortening the time that people are in shelters, which are not meant for long term use. We have to hold providers responsible for the duration of stay in their shelters and reward providers who accelerate departures. I will consider all options to accomplish this including expanding affordable housing stock through quality basement apartments, accessory dwelling units, and communal housing.

Dianne Morales

The Morales Administration would declare housing a right. In the midst of an unprecedented health crisis, high unemployment and our city’s failure to address chronic homelessness, it is imperative to our collective safety and security that every New Yorker has a place to call home that is dignified, peaceful and without harm. But having a roof over one’s head is not where the crisis ends. New York City has been in the middle of a housing and rent affordability crisis for decades. The current status quo favors and prioritizes speculation and powerful private interests and has led to displacement, homelessness and exorbitantly high burdens on renters and the city’s working class. The history of redlining, blockbusting, gentrification, government neglect and big bank predatory practices, as well as private subsidies and other market gimmicks, have perpetuated a legacy of racial, gender, and class inequality, cruelty and injustice. It’s time we change that. Under my leadership, we will ensure that Housing First is the approach, and move away from the City’s shelter first policies.

Kathryn Garcia

I will commit to a Housing First solution which I define as looking for ways to keep households at risk of homelessness in their homes and rapidly placing households experiencing homelessness in permanent housing. In order to do this, we must dramatically increase the supply of affordable housing to phase out the use of shelters which will take time. Keeping New Yorkers housed and out of shelters is the right thing to do and also helps break the cycle of homelessness. Children who experience homelessness are more likely to experience homelessness as adults. We need to provide all New Yorkers, and especially kids, with stable housing.

Quanda Francis

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Chris Kreitchman

Yes, I absolutely will. To me 'Housing First' is part of a basic human rights and needs are part of a bigger topic. I believe that we must New Minimal Standard of Living in New York City. Basic Human Rights & Needs are priority with the beginning of my platform. Every single New Yorker must have a Home, Food, Water, Hygiene, Healthcare, and Technology in the 21st Century. This covers people's Needs, not Wants. Once a human's needs are completely met then they can focus on their wants, and NYC will create access for all people and communities to grow.

Andrew Yang

Yes, we must make meaningful gains in reducing our shelter population and street homelessness and this includes taking a housing first approach. Instead of having homeless people languishing in expensive shelters for a year or more, I would move to have those identified as homeless and living on the streets become eligible for supportive housing and expedited into their own apartments, in other words Housing First. The programs and policies I would use to create that housing is explained in response to question 1.

Bill Pepitone

Housing First is a completely different approach then what New York City has taken for years. Permanent housing must be the goal as opposed to temporary shelters. The goal of supportive housing is to help get individuals back on their feet and assimilate them back into society. Through counseling, the teaching of trades, and career assistance we can help place those that are struggling back into a permanent home instead of a shelter.

Scott Stringer

It’s simple: housing is a human right, and the City must approach ending homelessness from that perspective to help homeless New Yorkers into permanent housing, not just temporary shelter. I support a “housing first” model for approaching homelessness with the goal of ending homelessness with permanently affordable housing, as well as investing in Safe Haven, stabilization, and supportive housing to help unsheltered New Yorkers into safe, dignified housing with the services they need to maintain stability while addressing mental health, substance abuse and other challenges.

As mentioned above, this approach necessitates fusing our housing policies with our homelessness policies; building truly affordable low-income housing; preserving the housing we have and ending the eviction crisis; and addressing non-eviction related homelessness such as domestic violence. In addition, we need to break through cycles of poverty and homelessness, address mental health and substance use with long-term supports, and end the over-criminalization of communities by taking a public health approach to public safety.

Fernando Mateo

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Aaron Foldenauer

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Eric Adams

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Curtis Sliwa

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Isaac Wright

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Joycelyn Taylor

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Shaun Donovan

Yes! As President Obama’s HUD Secretary, I led the national strategy that reduced street homelessness by a quarter across the country and ended veteran homelessness in more than 80 cities and states.

Housing First means that we need to solve homelessness through housing programs - not homelessness programs. It means that every resident deserves the right to stable housing.

We will create and fully implement a simple, client-focused process of placement of individuals and families who are homeless into safe, affordable permanent housing. Increasing the speed from which people move from homeless into permanent housing will relieve pressure on the homeless system. This streamlined system will build upon the Coordinated Assessment and Placement System (CAPS) model which focuses on getting the right person into the right housing as quickly as possible, based on the individual or family needs. Managing housing placement across systems will allow the city to hold itself and the landlords accountable for timely placements and housing stability.

We must make sure to expand the creation of permanent supportive housing units for those who need the more intensive support provided by this form of housing. The administration will aim to create 2,000 supportive housing units annually for individuals and families living with a serious mental illness, substance use disorder, or other disability, and young adults.

In parallel, we must expand models of shelter that have very easy access, such as safe havens and stabilization beds, recognizing that some people, particularly those living on the streets, do not want to enter the shelter system.

And, we will fund a service-enriched model of aftercare for formerly homeless New Yorkers, to ensure that formerly homeless people are supported in their new homes. The program will be administered through neighborhood-based centers that provide holistic aftercare and “poverty alleviation” services to local communities.

Maya Wiley

“I support a Housing First model, and believe we should build on its success by moving homeless individuals to subsidized housing and then linking them to support services. We would save money by investing in permanent supportive housing and models such as supported SROS. Next, public housing MUST remain public. Within that, we need to find creative solutions to fund public housing, especially with NYCHA facing $40 billion in capital needs."

Source: Open Hearts Initiative questionnaire

Art Chang

Absolutely. Housing in our city is too expensive -- many homeless people and families have simply fallen behind on a few rent payments. First, we need to address the urgent housing crisis that COVID has caused. I would immediately extend the eviction and foreclosure moratoriums to March 31, 2022, for residential and small business renters and their landlords. Then, I’d work with mortgage brokers to provide mortgage extensions to landlords who pass through the benefits to tenants. Doing this would cancel accrued debt for tenants and landlords alike. I would also address property taxes, fees, and other costs through a similar mechanism.

Then, to address the homelessness crisis in the long-term, I would invest in the largest construction of truly affordable housing in the city since WWII. To do this, I would start with a creative approach to re-assessing City property ownership including underutilized property like parking lots, air rights including air rights over roads, and rail yards. The City’s 21 golf courses represent significant development opportunities, starting with the Trump course in the Bronx. I’d then give those in shelters and current NYCHA residents the first right to new housing, and collect and publish data to demonstrate performance on all issues related to housing.

Paperboy Prince

While not explicitly stated on the candidate's website, ending homelessness is a commitment of Paperboy Prince’s according to an article in the Brooklyn Paper: "Prince says that love is the central ingredient trying together their platform, which includes universal basic income, healthcare for all, ending homelessness, and making the city more environmentally friendly."

Source: Brooklyn Paper 2/24/2021 Paperboy Prince Wants to be the Youngest Mayor in New York City History

Ray McGuire

I support a Housing First model. Shelters were not made for long term use, yet the average time spent for families in shelters is a staggering 443 days. As mayor, I will shorten the time frame that people are in shelters. I will put an end to street sweeps and invest in transitional services for those in vulnerable situations, so that they have a pathway to permanent housing and can access vital social services.

Dianne Morales

The Morales Administration will be utilizing data to review, assess, and address disparities throughout the City and to begin tackling these systemic issues through a strong equity & response lens. We’d begin by sharing numbers of how many unhoused New Yorkers we were able to survey, how many New Yorkers were at-risk of losing their homes, and how many New Yorkers were currently in the City’s shelter system (and for how long). We’d work backwards from there to quickly begin the move of ensuring New Yorkers were able to move into permanent housing and will share those numbers. We would ensure that these metrics were public and easy to access so that we can continue to be held accountable for the work.

Kathryn Garcia

Yes. My housing plan will focus on the metrics that matter - how many New Yorkers are rent-burdened, how many New Yorkers are living in homeless shelters, and how many New Yorkers are experiencing street homelessness. Given the time it will take to phase out of shelters entirely, I will also focus on the length of time it takes to place New Yorkers experiencing homelessness in permanent housing and keep a close eye on the demographics to understand if more targeted interventions are needed for specific populations.

Quanda Francis

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Chris Kreitchman

As Mayor, yes, I absolutely would support setting measurable goals for reducing and ending homelessness in New York City. I would expose all metrics that exist and new ones that will be created, such as inefficiencies and corruption. This should be readily available to all taxpayers to see the ROI for their tax dollars, as well as knowing the efficacies of non-profits and other involved NGOs. We must raise the standard of living in NYC to immediately provide homes for the homeless, prevent people from going homeless, and make sure that all basic human needs are met for free here in NYC. This includes access to food, water, health, hygiene, home, and technology (or access to information and reporting).

Andrew Yang

Absolutely. I believe metrics, gathering good data and laying out clear goals will keep my administration accountable. Here are my goals:

- Reduce the street homelessness population by 50% in my first term

- Double the number of drop-in sites from 7 to 14

- Establish a 20% reduction in the sheltered population over four years

- Reduce the length of stay in the shelter system by ⅓ in a year

Bill Pepitone

Yes, it is imperative to set goals and to make them transparent so there is accountability upon the Mayor and City agencies. We will provide real data to show that our plan is working, true numbers that will represent the number of homeless individuals and families that have been placed in permanent housing. That is the only way we can be honest with New Yorkers and show that we are truly invested in ending this crisis.

Scott Stringer

Our overall goal should be bringing the number of homeless New Yorkers in shelter and on the street down, as well as lowering the number of New Yorkers on the brink. Hundreds of thousands are in housing distress – shelling out more than half their income in rent and/or overcrowded.

To achieve that, the City need to focus its housing approach on metrics of need — both in terms of setting goals for reducing need and how we design our policy do so.

For too long, the City has created goals around the number of housing units needed to be constructed, but failed to consider the level of affordability needed. It does not matter if we build 200,000 units if those units are not affordable to those who are struggling the most. I believe the city should establish a needsbased model to serve those at risk of becoming homeless or those who are homeless themselves. Following this needs-based model, 77% of all new construction subsidized by the city should be for extremely low income residents or below, 21% for very low income or below and the remaining 2% for all other incomes. Rents should be set to 30% of income, and using the HUD income levels, based on family size. Currently, extremely low income for example is defined as below 30% of AMI or $30,720 per year for a family of three and very low income is below 50% of AMI or $51,300 for a family.

Fernando Mateo

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Aaron Foldenauer

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Eric Adams

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Curtis Sliwa

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Isaac Wright

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Joycelyn Taylor

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Shaun Donovan

We will invest in real-time data across all city agencies that allows for recognizing the needs of people currently or at risk of experiencing homelessness and delivering services in a targeted way. We will also expand the Bronx Frequent Users System Engagement data sharing system—which identifies frequent users of jails, shelters, and hospitals and connects them with supportive housing and other services—to the other four boroughs.

In order to link historically distinct City departments under singular leadership for greater accountability and consistency, we will empower a single Deputy Mayor for Housing Opportunity & Economic Development to assert clear goals and demand progress in addressing NYC’s homeless crisis across agencies including the Department of Education, Administration for Children’s Services, Department of Homelessness Services, Department of Housing Preservation and Development, and NYCHA. We will also improve targeting of homeless services by creating a 21st Century integrated data system, improving data sharing and communications across agencies, and enhancing the use of predictive analytics while ensuring racial equity.

In the case of hospitals, we must create medical respite programs with pathways to permanent housing to reduce the revolving door between hospitals and homelessness for people experiencing homelessness who have complex medical needs. We will develop and implement a city-level legal framework and programmatic approach to provide medical respite care for vulnerable populations that ultimately leads them to housing. Also, the City should provide funding of hospital-based housing specialists and develop a formal protocol on how hospitals and street outreach teams should communicate and collaborate. And, we will work with health providers, including hospitals, to prioritize available land for senior or homeless housing and explore how health care payers might directly invest in affordable senior and homeless housing with services.

Maya Wiley

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Art Chang

A foundational principle of my platform is that data is key to success. The Mayor’s office needs clear, reliable data in order to function properly; and the public needs clear, reliable data to hold its government accountable. I will commit to increasing the amount of data we have on the needs of each individual community, so that we can get away from the one-size-fits-all approaches and customize our responses to certain crises to fit each community.

Of course maintaining accurate, up-to-date data on how many homeless folks we have outside and in shelters is the most obvious metric. We also need data on how these folks become homeless, and work not just to provide affordable housing, but also to address these other, interconnected issues that lead to homelessness. And as we’ve seen in recent news reports, the Mayor’s office needs to be more hands-on with privately-owned shelters, and be able to provide oversight on their operations to ensure they’re providing truly safe spaces for people & families to live in.

I will also study data on construction costs, and use that data to pursue creative approaches to lowering development costs.

I believe that when we are again able to have a thriving arts community in NYC, we’ll know we’ve made our city as a whole more affordable.

Paperboy Prince

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Ray McGuire

I would absolutely look to set measurable goals for reducing homelessness. I will hold providers responsible for the duration of stay in their shelters, and take my management experience to simplify the bureaucracy and streamline services across agencies. Within my first hundred days I will begin the process of reviewing all contracts with homelessness service providers and establishing clear metrics, so that we can ensure accountability and move resources to those providing the highest quality of services. I will also meet with advocates and New Yorkers experiencing homelessness in order to ensure that our approach is fully inclusive.

Dianne Morales

The key word is emergency. Under the Morales Administration, we’d be tracking to see how long New Yorkers stay within the shelter system, and moving towards building a system that can see New Yorkers almost immediately moved to permanent social and supportive housing. For those at-risk, we’d be fighting through means of Right to Counsel, expanding who can benefit from and receive Cash Assistance, lowering rents, and more to keep New Yorkers in their homes.

Kathryn Garcia

The City is legally and morally obligated to provide shelter for all New Yorkers. However, shelters should be a last resort solution and durations should be short. We should be focusing resources on eviction prevention and the expansion of affordable housing options for the lowest income New Yorkers. No one should spend years in shelter.

Quanda Francis

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Chris Kreitchman

The role of emergency shelter in helping New Yorkers at risk of or experiencing homelessness is vital and paramount. No New Yorker should ever not have a place to live in one of the richest cities of the world, and to be extremely clear about this, we are talking about having a safe, clean, and healthy space to live in - especially now with a global pandemic people need space at home and can no longer live crammed in extreme tight spaces. This is where we must, as a city, set a standard of real minimal living spaces at the bare minimum with public health and wellness as an absolute priority.

Andrew Yang

We need to do all we can to expand shelter capacity in a way that will be used by individuals and families who need it. This includes increased drop in centers while at risk individuals are waiting for supportive housing or placement into the more desirable Safe Haven shelters. These drop in centers provide food, clothing, showers, medical care, and a social worker. The city only has seven drop in centers, and I propose that we double the number to 14 so that people can get off the streets easily and find a place to go instead of riding the subways. I will also increase the number of Safe Haven shelters which have been successful in moving people off the streets and subways.

Bill Pepitone

Emergency shelters are essential as the first line of assistance for those at risk. We simply cannot allow individuals or families to spend days and nights on our streets. We are better than that. We will use our shelters as an intake center and temporary housing as we move forward into the counseling and assistance phase where the goal is first to avoid people from losing their homes and then to provide permanent housing if necessary

Scott Stringer

Together with outreach, coordinated entry, prevention, and permanent housing, emergency shelter is a core pillar in the fight to end homelessness. But, it must be leveraged not as an end in-and-of-itself, but as a pathway to connecting New Yorkers with permanent housing. That has been one of the failures of this current administration, which has doubled spending on homelessness to more than $3 billion without reducing the population of New Yorkers experiencing homelessness.

In the wealthiest city in the wealthiest country in the world, allowing nearly 17,000 of our children to sleep in shelters every night is a disgrace. Further, the city has failed to address the rising single-adult shelter population, which has reached an all time high of more than 18,500 individuals. And the City’s current approach of throwing more and more money into temporary shelter capacity—like converted hotels charging exorbitant rates—is a band-aid, not a permanent strategy.

To chart a new course and end homelessness, we need an approach that gets at the root causes—namely, housing. All New Yorkers should have a safe, stable roof over their heads, no matter their background or the challenges they face, from mental health crises to substance use and domestic violence.

Fernando Mateo

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Aaron Foldenauer

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Eric Adams

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Curtis Sliwa

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Isaac Wright

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Joycelyn Taylor

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Shaun Donovan

We are committed to reducing the size of the emergency shelter system - and reducing the length of shelter stays, but it's unrealistic to think we will do away with it entirely. Emergency shelters play an important role in helping people who hit a crisis and fall through the cracks of the regular assistance programs. But shelter stays should be short, and we will prioritize moving assistance upstream to reduce the number of people who have to rely on shelters.

Maya Wiley

"A 2019 analysis by the Coalition for the Homeless found that it costs the city $47,000 a year to provide emergency shelter to a single adult and $82,000 for a family. When taking into account emergency shelter, emergency room visits, and longer shelter stays, a single eviction costs the City $8,000. An estimated 400,000 families are on the brink of eviction, meaning the cost of evictions for the public is conservatively estimated to be nearly $3.2 billion."

"But in order to keep people in their homes, and realize the humanitarian benefits and financial savings from doing so, we need to make a significant initial investment in direct rent relief."

Source: Candidate website

Art Chang

Emergency shelter is just that: it’s for emergencies. When we have enough truly affordable housing for everyone, the need for emergency shelter will be reduced and the capacity inside shelters will be more manageable.

And when delivering emergency shelter to those who do need it, we need to better adapt to each person’s emergency. For example, trans youth often end up in shelters fleeing violence or lack of acceptance at home; they may need single-room accommodations. For some, homelessness is a result of mental health issues, and our emergency shelters need to be equipped to care for them. And shelters need to be held accountable when they don’t provide safe or healthy environments for their residents.

Paperboy Prince

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Ray McGuire

My goal as mayor is to secure permanent housing for everyone. I will make sure that all homeless shelter contracts explicitly require those outcomes, so we can vastly shrink the number of people who need emergency temporary housing.

Dianne Morales

Under the Morales Administration, housing is a human right, which means there are no waiting periods to see whether or not someone should be allowed to receive assistance. As we work to rebuild our social safety net, there will be a surge of hiring social workers, therapists, peacemakers, and more who can look at someone holistically and find ways to find them the care and programs necessary. While we don’t necessarily have it down to details of what we would “require” in order to be eligible, we’d focus on ensuring that standards were based around the ability to output, and working to ensure that “affordable housing” is no more than 30% of what a New Yorker makes in a year with qualifiers for those who are vulnerable including (and not limited to) LGBTQIA youths, disabled New Yorkers, seniors, and more.

Kathryn Garcia

Rental assistance should target anyone on the verge of homelessness, period. However this would require significant investment from the federal and NYS government to be as broad as needed. Regardless, in my administration I would create clear and and easily documented standards for evaluating risk of homelessness (loss of income and increasing rent burden due to a wide variety of factors such as job loss, health issues etc) with no required shelter stay. I would ensure that funding is delivered swiftly and effectively as well as vigorously enforce [against] discrimination that keeps households from finding apartments that take the vouchers.

Quanda Francis

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Chris Kreitchman

To answer this in 2021, I have to be completely honest. No one experiencing homelessness should “have to spend” any amount of days in a city shelter before becoming eligible for City rental assistance. Prevention is the absolute key here and so those who may possibly be facing homelessness, or ALL New Yorkers, should have the opportunity and access to this New York City assistance. To address the potential for people taking advantage of this system, we will employ teams of people to help validate, but not make it impossible to access this program.

Andrew Yang

Another important weapon to reduce shelter population is rental assistance programs. Although there has been some success in the past with these programs, we are now at a point where the city’s payment structure is substantially less than what landlords will accept. For example the city’s rental assistance program, Family Homeless and Eviction Prevention Supplement (“FHEPS”) will only pay approximately $1,600 a month for a family of four while Federal Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers pays $2000 a month. This difference results in landlords refusing to accept FHEPS vouchers while they wait for a Housing Choice Voucher. It is ridiculous that due to a gap of a few hundred dollars a month, families are remaining in shelters which cost $6000 a month. I will immediately move to make the city’s rental assistance program equivalent to the section 8 standards. I will also hold landlords accountable if they refuse to accept the vouchers. Tenants who are on the verge of eviction and are paying more than 50% of their income on rent would be eligible for rental assistance to help them stay out of shelter. In addition, we’re going to push the State to pass the Home Stability Support Bill, which provides a rent supplement of 85% of the difference between the fair market value of a two bedroom apartment ($1,951) in NYC and the current shelter supplement.

Bill Pepitone

Ninety days is too long for individuals and families to spend in a shelter. We will shorten the wait time significantly to expedite cases. We will set up a streamlined process through the Department of Homeless Services under the new leadership of a Deputy Mayor whose sole responsibility is oversight and follow up. We will provide the proper technology and information dissemination to ensure the process is efficient.

Scott Stringer

We can work to end homelessness by helping New Yorkers experiencing homelessness find housing and those on the brink to stay housed. One critical tool the City has is its voucher system, which can provide individuals facing economic and housing instability with immediate relief. However, CityFHEPS vouchers are overly restrictive and underutilized as a prevention tool, too often requiring individuals at risk of housing instability to enter shelter before they qualify for assistance. Individuals and families who do not wish to brave the often dangerous conditions in shelters are left without resources. As mayor, I will end this practice, eliminate the 90-day requirement, and ensure that sufficient vouchers are available before entering the shelter door.

The value of CityFHEPS vouchers is also far too low to actually provide meaningful access to housing in this city. I support Intro 146, and would call on the Speaker to immediately schedule a vote and for the Council to pass the bill. The current City voucher is worth only $1,323 for a household of two in a one bedroom, while a comparable HUD voucher would be $1,714. For the City's vouchers to be useful, they must be worth at least the fair market rent. At the same time, we must also be more flexible and do a better job of centering individuals’ circumstances in the structure of the City voucher program. No one should be denied stable housing, especially after being issued shopping letter after shopping letter over many months if not years, because they had picked up an extra shift at work. But rigid income eligibility requirements make that all too common.

Further, the City must increase penalties and do more to aggressively fine landlords who discriminate based on source of income, educate voucher holders of their rights, and ensure credit is not a barrier to safe housing by eliminating the need for credit checks for voucher holders.

Fernando Mateo

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Aaron Foldenauer

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Eric Adams

"New Yorkers on the brink of homelessness and in shelters need far greater assistance than is available now to transition into permanent housing. One way we will accomplish this is by increasing the value of the City FHEPS housing vouchers so they reflect the value of the housing that is actually available in our city. There was a time when $1,323 for a one bedroom and $1,580 for a two bedroom was sufficient, but that time is long gone. And when the cost of a person in the shelter system is $124, and the cost of a family is $196 per day, increasing the value of vouchers is common sense governing."

Source: Candidate website

Curtis Sliwa

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Isaac Wright

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Joycelyn Taylor

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Shaun Donovan

We will work collaboratively with the state to increase annual spending on emergency rental assistance to $500 million and increase the amount of arrears covered to $5,000 per household. This program will provide support before renters get to housing court and certainly before emergency shelter. This emergency support will reach some 100,000 New Yorkers struggling or unable to pay rent due to economic setbacks.

We also propose a longer-term city assistance program: In order to help prevent families from becoming homeless in the first place, we must create a new, flexible rental assistance program that could serve 200,000 low-income households per year when the program fully ramps up. The administration would commit $330 million from reducing reliance on shelter, with an additional $500 million coming from state matching funds, and $1 billion from the federal government.

Maya Wiley

"In order to keep people in their homes, and realize the humanitarian benefits and financial savings from doing so, we need to make a significant initial investment in direct rent relief. This week, Congressional Republicans finally stopped playing politics with people’s lives and a COVID-19 relief package was passed. Based on initial estimates, we anticipate $251M in Emergency Rental Assistance funding for the City. This will provide much-needed relief, but it still does not come close to addressing the massive housing crisis that has been exacerbated by this pandemic."

"We must increase the City FHEPs subsidy from the current $1200 per month and restructure it so that homeless New Yorkers can actually afford an apartment. Under the current system, less than 5% of voucher recipients are able to find an affordable apartment."

Source: Candidate website and Open Hearts Initiative questionnaire

Art Chang

The problem needs to be addressed prior to losing homes, if at all possible. For households and individuals losing homes due to economic hardship or health crises, City Hall needs to create a mechanism to prevent loss of homes. Given the costs of transitional housing ($176/nt for singles, $240/nt for families), it’s generally far less expensive to keep people in their homes than to move them into a shelter.

Technology can help but it has to be available on every “channel” and we need to provide a non-technology process for this. I don’t have an answer, but also need to consider disabled, elderly and other people.

Emergency shelter should be focused on people fleeing unsafe home situations, like domestic violence against women and LGBTQIA+ people.

Paperboy Prince

While not explicitly stated on the candidate's website,"their plan to cancel rent and mortgages for the next two years" is referenced in interviews as part of Paperboy Prince’s policy platform for Mayor.

Source: Brooklyn Paper 2/24/2021 Paperboy Prince Wants to be the Youngest Mayor in New York City History

Ray McGuire

As soon as my administration begins, I would include an initial increase for rental subsidies in my first budget, which I would then look to build on as city revenues return. These rental subsidies would be open to all who are at risk of being evicted or who are experiencing homelessness for any length of time. In 2019, more than half of Black and Latino renters spent a third of their income on rent. As job and income losses related to the pandemic disproportionately fall on these same families, they are more likely to face eviction. I would put added focus on taking aggressive steps to prevent individuals from experiencing homelessness in the first place, and thinking ahead of the eviction crisis that could be upon us after the moratorium ends.

Dianne Morales

Housing for All is not just about a roof and four walls; it’s about living in dignity and we know the state of housing stability is intimately interconnected to the quality of one’s education, environment, safety, health and food security. Like mentioned above, the Morales Administration will be appointing a Deputy Mayor who will work to coordinate, citywide, cross-sector to address all these different buckets, and ensure that those who turn to the City for help, especially our youth and DV survivors, are able to experience care immediately, to stabilize them, to support them, and to eventually see them in secure, permanent housing.

Kathryn Garcia

Everybody should have access to permanent housing. Regardless of how a person becomes homeless or which shelter they are in, every New Yorker experiencing homelessness should be able to receive both targeted services that reflect what they need but also access to permanent housing placements and rental assistance. I would work to coordinate and plan across these different systems to reduce the amount of time people spend in shelters.

Quanda Francis

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Chris Kreitchman

Simply put, I will remove barriers to entrance for any and all New Yorkers in need. Living in NYC is and can be difficult enough, accessing systems and programs that are designed to help people in need should in no way be difficult to reach, access, and/or use. Therefore; I will create a team that will come from outside the current system to lower barriers and remove institutional corruption, racism, and all biases from preventing New Yorkers that are in need to create a massive overhauling of the systems. This will also be made completely transparent and reported upon quarterly directly to the people of NYC.

Andrew Yang

The number one cause of homelessness among families with children is domestic violence. However, only 23% of the domestic violence victims are in specialized DV shelters. The overwhelming majority are in the regular shelter system and are not receiving appropriate services. I will greatly expand the number of DV shelters and I will also give priority to DV families to move out of shelter and into apartments at NYCHA.

Bill Pepitone

The only way to ensure such is to create a Deputy Mayor position who will oversee the City's response and coordinate all agencies under one office. This will improve information sharing and eliminate administrative and bureaucratic obstacles so those in crisis receive immediate and full assistance.

Scott Stringer

One of the leading drivers of homelessness in New York City today is domestic violence, accounting for 41% of the family population entering homeless shelters — 90% women of color. Half of the families in shelter have Black heads of household and Black women also experience among the highest rates of interpersonal violence. Further, many single adults who enter the shelter system come from unstable homes that often include incidents of domestic violence. To address this challenge, the City and State must take a comprehensive approach that increases the capacity of the domestic violence emergency shelter system; addresses gaps in our laws so survivors who can remain safely in their homes are able to maintain their housing; provides rapid financial assistance to meet immediate needs through a Survivor Housing Stability Fund, and provides a new statewide rent supplement to assist vulnerable populations that include domestic violence survivors.

As mayor, I will commit to increasing capacity for New Yorkers (youth and adults) who require single room placement for reasons of health and safety, including those with mobility issues and/or are LGBTQ+. I will redouble efforts to specifically create and fund programs for LGBTQ+ homeless youth, including providing LGBTQ+ homeless youth with significant health, educational, workforce, and legal support and creating local 24-hour drop-in locations for LGBTQ+ youth. Additionally, on my watch, the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice will be required to connect New Yorkers who are exiting the criminal legal system to a safe place to live.

Fernando Mateo

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Aaron Foldenauer

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Eric Adams

"New Yorkers in local shelters—especially those who lived in the neighborhood beforehand and were displaced—will be prioritized for supportive housing. So too will young people aging out of foster care, who should be given every chance at starting off adulthood on the right foot."

Source: Candidate website

Curtis Sliwa

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Isaac Wright

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Joycelyn Taylor

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Shaun Donovan

In addition to the permanent housing support programs we will put in place, we will also work toward supporting especially vulnerable communities in a number of ways.

The COVID-19 Pandemic has revealed how limited the current programs are in supporting our communities in times of crisis. We will work collaboratively with the state to increase annual spending on emergency rental assistance to $500 million and increase the amount of arrears covered to $5,000 per household. This program will provide support before renters get to housing court and certainly before emergency shelter. This emergency support will reach some 100,000 New Yorkers struggling or unable to pay rent due to economic setbacks.

In addition, we will create a domestic-violence-focused flexible funding reserve that addresses problems and expenses before they lead to rent arrears and the possibility of homelessness, helping domestic violence survivors and their children remain housed after a case of domestic violence. The administration will work with and listen to domestic violence survivors to determine which pathways are appropriate.

Maya Wiley

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Art Chang

The City, under my Mayorship, will prioritize revamping our City’s websites and technological infrastructure, utilizing technology to deliver services to its constituents. In order to fortify New York’s technological infrastructure for the future, much-needed updates need to be made. These include streamlining citizen experience with government websites, ensuring that every home in this city has broadband access, and creating transparency for New Yorkers and enhancing the responsiveness and accessibility of information services. Every individual that needs government assistance should know what’s available to them and how to access it.

There’s an opportunity to integrate and unify these separate processes, because often the issues are combined. See above for rental subsidies.

Paperboy Prince

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Ray McGuire

One of my priorities when it comes to addressing homelessness is to provide people in shelters with comprehensive tailored support services like mental health counseling and substance abuse treatment programs, especially to underserved groups. I will ensure that there are other key services like job training and placement, and childcare programs as well. Addressing educational needs like broadband and adequate wifi are critical for students experiencing homelessness to keep up with their school curriculums. I will also invest in more alternatives to shelter, including medical respite beds, and safe havens for individuals who are unable or hesitant to enter the larger shelter system. Most importantly, I will ensure a pathway to permanent housing for all and will explore every option available to expand affordable housing stock through quality basement apartments, accessory dwelling units and communal housing. I will focus on streamlining communication between agencies and shelters, so that there are similar standards of quality social services and housing assistance.

Dianne Morales

A few things we’re adhering to: The city’s development partnerships will favor nonprofit and missiondriven organizations, Community Development Corporations, supportive housing, tenants groups and alliances. An expanded cooperative ownership agenda will put increasing control of social housing and existing developments in the hands of tenants. This involves desegregating, preserving and expanding new cooperative housing ownership as well as Mitchell-Lama and Housing Development Fund Corporation (HDFC) Cooperatives as permanently affordable homeownership alternatives for present and future New Yorkers; Due to ULURP failure to meet community needs, my administration will advocate for a community planning approach: zoning will reflect a balance between neighborhood and city-wide needs, and involve participatory processes to normalize more democratic and inclusionary community-centered goals. We will make better use of existing housing infrastructure by getting rid of single-family zoning, ensuring accessory dwelling and basement units are legal, safe and affordable, & enacting flexible zoning that allows for the conversion of vacant office space and hotels into social, affordable residential options. We will prepare for a growing demographic of senior citizens by expanding and strengthening the Senior Citizen Rent Increase Exemption, & investing in rental assistance and retrofits; fight housing court evictions, enforce national and state moratoriums, & expand partnerships with public interest attorneys to serve as counsel to protect New Yorkers during the current health crisis; ban criminal background checks on potential tenants, eliminate source of income discrimination & streamline application processes; Fund Right to Counsel to provide free, comprehensive legal representation for tenant interests; & better regulate rental marketplaces to prevent holds on vacant apartments and prevent the market from using short-term hotels without any of the compliance or revenue.

Kathryn Garcia

My administration will more actively engage different sectors to prevent and end homelessness, including the the Department of Corrections and the Department of Probation to improve placements of formerly incarcerated New Yorkers into permanent housing, shaping targeted workforce development programs at the Department of Small Business Services to help workers move up the wage ladder and increase incomes, and engaging our hospital systems to support affordable housing construction within hospital campuses to bring the healing power of housing to more New Yorkers.

Quanda Francis

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Chris Kreitchman

We have great resources here in NYC in the Private Sector and my administration will create a team that’s sole purpose is to develop ethical and transparent partnerships that will fund and expand all social services to raise the minimally acceptable standard of living to a New 21st Century Standard to include all my points to remove any possibility of homelessness in the future, but that will take time and great disruption, and yet it is also not impossible. Mental Health and Support is a tremendous component to supporting this as well as job retraining and re-educating, and so much more. We must and will make changes for the sake of the people who make all aspects of this city operate day to day.

Andrew Yang

It is estimated that nearly 50% of the clients in single adult shelters have a mental illness and this number is greater with the street homeless. However, between 2014 and 2018 we lost 15% of the psychiatric beds. I would work closely with the state to substantially increase the number of psychiatric beds and provide mental health services in all single shelters not just specialized shelters. In addition, I would work with the state prison system to get them from sending nearly 5,000 recently released prisoners into the shelter system every year. The state must do a better job of discharge planning including halfway houses. As noted in my response to question 1, I would also enlist owners of Class B residential buildings and obsolete commercial buildings, as well as developers, to create more affordable housing. My administration would offer forgivable grants and regulatory relief for owners who convert, with larger forgivable grants for conversions to supportive housing and/or deeply affordable housing. My Reformed MIH program would offer additional FAR and density bonuses in exchange for more deeply affordable housing in new developments.

Bill Pepitone

I would incorporate the NYPD, the Board of Education and Children's Services into our plan to end homelessness. The NYPD has direct contact with those on our streets and encounter so many of the issues that place people in crisis. That first interaction is crucial. The BOE is essential as teachers interact with children on a daily basis and can ascertain if the child's family is displaced or having trouble providing food and nutrition. Children's Services is, of course, a must as their complaint and case investigations and follow ups can provide a look into a family's circumstances and if the possibility of imminent homelessness exists.

Scott Stringer

We need to make our economy more fair and end the cycles of poverty, incarceration, homelessness, and an unequal health care system.

As mayor, I would pursue an economic justice that includes expanded access to workforce protections that allow New Yorkers to care for themselves and their families and to maintain their livelihoods, such as paid leave, and building local community-led job networks to build economic security. Although we have won significant protections in recent years, many workers — low-wage, part-time, temporary, and gig workers — continue to fall through the cracks of our existing policies. In addition, I would create a local “network coordinator” to serve as a point person in every Community District in order to strengthen the pipeline between local businesses and residents, especially in rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods where displacement is rampant.

We also must take a long-term and holistic approach to end the relentless cycle of incarceration and homelessness fueled by the criminalization of poverty and lack of sustained services that disproportionately impacts Black and brown New Yorkers. In addition to having led fights to abolish forprofit bail and eliminate mandatory court surcharges, fines, and fees in our criminal legal system, I’ve outlined a public safety blueprint to continue the work of ending the criminalization of poverty and advance a decarceral agenda for New York.

This must include refocusing our approach to mental health and substance use to reduce harm and connect New Yorkers with long-term services. Mental health and substance use are medical matters, not criminal offenses. As mayor, I would take a multi-agency, public health-focused approach, transitioning responsibilities away from NYPD and investing in alternative responses and services, as well as pursue citywide harm reduction policies.

Fernando Mateo

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Aaron Foldenauer

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Eric Adams

"Poverty, homelessness, unemployment and food insecurity all directly lead to poor health—yet hospitals are largely not equipped to address those issues. By utilizing the extra capacity in H+H hospitals to colocate social services, we will address both the social and physical causes of illness, leading to much better outcomes and cost savings."

"Living in a high-crime community and experiencing gun violence creates trauma that impacts a youth’s ability to perform in school and achieve in life. Without adequate services that address trauma and allow for healing, youth are placed at higher risk of incarceration, teenage pregnancy and homelessness. Prevention and follow up measures that serve to heal and support these youth are best delivered by trauma-trained credible messengers paired with mental health professionals, social services and violence interrupters. We will recruit, hire, and train community residents who have real-life experience to provide an immediate post-crisis healing space for, and to develop a working relationship with, affected youth. This helps reduce feelings of isolation and mistrust, cultivate shared investment of community-centered healing, and reduce the fear often associated with living in a high-crime, high-poverty neighborhood."

Source: Candidate website

Curtis Sliwa

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Isaac Wright

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Joycelyn Taylor

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Shaun Donovan

I would engage the criminal justice and healthcare sectors to prevent and end homelessness.

Building on a program that I piloted as Commissioner of the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, my Administration will provide housing vouchers to people leaving jail and prison to ensure that they can access housing, thus providing a platform for success in the community. As I said previously, we would use the FUSE system to identify at-risk individuals and connect them with supportive housing. In 2017, 54% of people released from state prisons to New York City went to a city homeless shelter. We will partner with the State and City correction departments to ensure housing placements for individuals exiting NYS and NYC jails & prisons while ensuring it does not impact parole prospects and public safety. We will work to break down barriers so that justice-involved people can access housing and jobs, and reunite with their families to get the support they need to thrive in their communities.

In the case of hospitals, we must create medical respite programs with pathways to permanent housing to reduce the revolving door between hospitals and homelessness for people experiencing homelessness who have complex medical needs. We will develop and implement a city-level legal framework and programmatic approach to provide medical respite care for vulnerable populations that ultimately leads them to housing. Also, the City should provide funding of hospital-based housing specialists and develop a formal protocol on how hospitals and street outreach teams should communicate and collaborate. And, we will work with health providers, including hospitals, to prioritize available land for senior or homeless housing and explore how health care payers might directly invest in affordable senior and homeless housing with services.

Maya Wiley

"Creating a new partnership with area law schools and pro-bono legal partners to introduce a community lawyering model. The program will provide legal counsel at the building level in cases where a significant number of tenants are facing eviction. This program would build on the existing legal infrastructure that has developed to provide counsel to individuals. One lawyer or team of lawyers would represent the interests of the tenants in the building. The attorney/attorneys would be better able to get to know building conditions and management and be better able to negotiate more effective agreements on behalf of tenants."

Source: Candidate website

Art Chang

One of my priorities is to find signs of economic distress that could be indicators for potential homelessness. These could include new filings for public assistance, new filing for unemployment insurance, and property tax delinquencies for homeowners. These could be compared against income data to infer potential distress.

My LGBTQIA+ platform includes education and raising awareness for parents, to help decrease the number of LGBTQIA+ children that need to leave their homes.

Paperboy Prince

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Ray McGuire

My administration would create “Emergency Social Services,” a 24/7 network of mental health, drug abuse, and homelessness specialists who can respond immediately to 911 calls instead of sending the police. In addition to Emergency Social Service teams, I will invest in mental health, homelessness, and youth services specialists embedded at the precinct level in every community to proactively engage with at-risk community members. These individuals will operate in tandem with the police to facilitate cooperation, referrals, and follow up. Other cities have shown promising results with this approach. I would like to see ESS units operating in every precinct in the five boroughs by 2023. This will create a long-term solution by connecting New Yorkers to care providers to treat the individual and not just the incident.

Dianne Morales

As seen above: a housing for all initiative that fights to decrease and stabilize rents, takes housing development and land significantly off the speculative market, and instead builds quality needs-based, mixed-income housing similar to the Vienna model. We would also implement a better use of land and existing space policy that includes a land value tax for vacant and blighted land to discourage speculation. Through the use of land banks, community land trusts, and cooperative housing models, a Morales administration would also democratize housing to meet New Yorker’s needs and not simply to profit off of space and real estate.

Kathryn Garcia

Previous housing plans have focused too much on the overall number of affordable housing units. Affordable units were like points on a scoreboard rather than part of a thoughtful, deliberate strategy to provide housing for the most severely rent-burdened New Yorkers. I will focus subsidy on supportive housing and deeply affordable housing and also make it easier for the market to build all types of housing - from basement apartments to accessory dwelling units to SROs - we need more supply throughout the entire City. I will also work with the Council to rezone neighborhoods to create new affordable housing in places with good access to transit, job centers, schools, and parks.

In addition to creating and preserving housing at the right income levels, I will also focus on eviction prevention and rental assistance to keep New Yorkers from becoming homeless in the first place.

Other policies I have committed to championing will also expand access to affordable housing. For example, I will champion a one-swipe in-city transportation network to integrate the subway, the LIRR and MetroNorth. If the MTA adopts this change, it will make it easier and cheaper for New Yorkers to commute to job centers - another way to keep New Yorkers housed.

Quanda Francis

"I will address the economic inequalities that are correlated with disparities in education, employment opportunities, access to safe and affordable housing, quality of life and access to quality and affordable healthcare."

Source: Candidate website

Chris Kreitchman

I would expand access to affordable housing in NYC for low-income New Yorkers in many ways. First, we need to clean up NYCHA, DOB, DOH, and many many more departments to expose and remove corruption and any barriers for New Yorkers in need. There are partnerships that can be created through large corporations operating and native to NYC that can be established to provide more affordable housing. We must also address property developers, banks, and REBNY (Real Estate Board of New York), as well as Albany’s impact on the real estate market here in NYC. We must have legislation passed in Albany that gets NYC back in control of its own city. This is just a start to a long road to change.

Andrew Yang

Due to the disruptions of the Covid-19 pandemic, we have a once in a generation opportunity to transform large swaths of New York City into affordable housing. As explained above, one of my administration’s first affordable housing initiatives would be to offer forgivable grants and regulatory relief to owners of Class B residential buildings and obsolete commercial office buildings who convert their properties to affordable housing and/or supportive housing. I estimate that we can create about 25,000 new units of affordable housing from this program by 2025.

In addition, I would use New York’s existing housing stock more creatively to expand supply. I would reform arcane laws that place arbitrary caps on the number of unrelated individuals who can share dwelling units in multi-family buildings and relax prohibitions on separate and independent living in dwelling units in multi-family builds. I would also ease the restrictions on the creation of rooming units. Reforming these parts of the City code will allow for the creation of more SRO-type residencies and legalize coliving, create thousands of new housing opportunities, much of it affordable. I’m also going to encourage the creation of microunits (also known as tiny homes and Small Efficiency Dwelling Units) by decreasing the Dwelling Unit Factor (the number of dwellings permitted on a lot depending on the allowable FAR) so that buildings with micro-units are permitted additional density and legalize accessory dwelling units (“ADUs”) so that basement occupancies, and additional dwellings built in the backyards of single family homes, are legal.

Finally, I support upzoning dense and transit rich communities and, through a Reformed MIH program in those upzoned areas. I’m going to give additional FAR bonus and density bonus to developers who commit to deep affordability (20% of units affordable to households earning less than 40% of AMI). Buildings using Reformed MIH would be allowed to contain micro-units and would be required to contain 25% three bedroom units, creating deeply affordable housing for New York’s lowest income working families. Expanding access to affordable housing for low income New Yorkers also requires revamping the way the City connects low income New Yorkers to suitable housing. That starts with rethinking “Housing Connect” (the website where income restricted units are marketed) as a mobile first platform accessible through a NYCApp, especially because the only internet connectivity low income New Yorkers often have is through their phones.

Bill Pepitone

Through development and growth. We need affordable housing, especially in these COVID-19 times where families are struggling and unemployment continues to rise. We will put a reasonable cap on income that will make more families eligible and put them in a position to recover while not facing the threat of becoming homeless.

Scott Stringer

I have a five-borough housing strategy to fundamentally realign New York City’s failed approach to our housing crisis and build the next generation of social housing targeted specifically for low and extremely low-income New Yorkers. My plan includes a new Universal Affordable Housing (UAH) requirement, ending 421-a, utilizing vacant city properties for those most in need of affordable housing, creating a NYC land bank and working in partnership with non-profit developers and community land trusts, and expanding home ownership opportunities.

Universal Affordable Housing The City’s inclusionary zoning program, Mandatory Inclusionary Housing (MIH), has centered the creation of affordable housing in specific neighborhoods and offers developers additional height and/or density in exchange for the construction of a certain percentage of affordable units. By every measure, MIH has been a failure. Much of this housing is not affordable to local residents; most of the housing built under the City’s ‘Housing New York’ plan is set at 80% of HUD-defined Area Median Income (AMI), or households making up to approximately $77,000 a year, or higher. As a result, instead of helping to stabilize those communities against displacement, MIH has fueled speculation and gentrification.

Under my plan, every new as-of-right development with ten or more units will be legally required to set aside a baseline of 25% of its units or 25% of its floor area for permanent, low-income affordable housing. These units would be affordable to families at an average of 60% of Area Median Income (household income of $58,000 a year for a family of three), or two parents making minimum wage and raising a child.

Ending 421-a

I have called for ending the City's most expensive and least effective affordable housing program: 421-a. This program produces affordable housing units which can be above market rate in many neighborhoods — and worse, many of these units are not even created. I would end 421-a and instead redirect subsidies toward real affordable housing, using the $1.6 billion to plug financing gaps, deepen affordability levels, increase the amount of affordability, and provide good-paying jobs.

Housing for Extremely Low and Very Low-Income New Yorkers The “affordable” housing created by the current Administration’s “Housing New York” plan is too expensive for as many as 435,000 of the city’s most severely rent-burdened households. An analysis by my office found that nearly 565,000 New York households pay over half of their income for rent, are severely overcrowded, or have been in a homeless shelter for over a year.

As mayor, I would start by looking at every City-owned vacant lot -- all 2,900 of them -- as a potential site for 100%, permanently affordable housing, in tandem with the creation of an NYC Land Bank and in partnership with community-based land trusts. Under my plan, all new construction of affordable housing on City-owned properties would be targeted to the roughly 580,000 New York City households with the greatest need for affordable housing. Almost 90% of these households make less than $47,000 per year for a family of three, yet less than 25% of the City’s affordable housing is currently being built for these New Yorkers.

Housing and Supporting Homeless New Yorkers We need to take a “housing first” approach to solving homelessness and recognize that when you build affordable and supportive housing for those most in need, you relieve pressure on the marketplace for others struggling to get by. It is appalling to me that in the richest city, in the richest nation in the world, we still have more than 60,000 New Yorkers sleeping in shelters every night. That will change under my administration.

In addition to the housing policy I’ve laid out above, under my watch, the City will prioritize finding subsidized homes for shelter residents, and constructing more supportive housing for those with additional needs. And we should reform the voucher system so that they reflect actual market rates and can be easily used. I also think that the contraction in the hotel industry caused by COVID, resulting in the shuttering of some 200 hotels, offers a rare opportunity for the City to purchase hotels that may come up for sale and convert them to safe, affordable housing or shelter for a broad range of New Yorkers.

Fernando Mateo

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Aaron Foldenauer

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Eric Adams

"To deal with our housing crisis in New York, the city must rapidly build new affordable housing while protecting existing apartments everywhere. That means bold, aggressive measures that are even more necessary now as we simultaneously fight a pandemic and an economic crisis. Here’s how:

- Up-zone wealthier areas where we can build far more affordable units.

- Repurpose city office buildings and hotels for affordable housing.

- Think big by thinking small and add basement apartments, SROs and other small units.

- Provide homes and help for the homeless and those struggling with rent.

- Add housing – for everyone – in wealthier areas.

For years, our re-zonings focused on adding apartments in lower-income areas—which led to higher income people moving in, making communities less affordable, and often forcing out longtime residents. We will build in wealthier areas with a high quality of life, allowing lower- and middle-income New Yorkers to move in by adding affordable housing. And we will eliminate the community preference rule in those areas, which keeps many New Yorkers out of desirable neighborhoods.

Repurpose City office buildings for affordable housing. We will convert a number of City office buildings into 100% affordable housing by taking advantage of more City workers working from home and consolidating workers that will still be in-person to free up space.

Allow private office buildings and hotels to become housing. The pandemic emptied many of our hotels and office buildings. In some cases, their owners want to convert the buildings to housing, but City regulations make that either too expensive or too challenging. With some zoning tweaks and other rule changes, we can allow appropriate conversions and add desperately needed housing stock—particularly at hotels in the outer boroughs.

Give City-owned property to non-profit land trusts to create affordable housing. Vacant and underused City property is a massive waste of our resources and often a blight on neighborhoods. In the midst of this housing crisis, we will aggressively seek to partner with community land trusts by offering properties to organizations that commit to building permanently affordable housing.

Think big by building small. Outdated rules prevent New York developers from building the kind of small, cheaper micro-units common around the world. Homeowners in single family zones are prevented from legally leasing “accessory units” like “granny flats.” And single room occupancy units, or SROs, and basement apartments are still illegal, despite their common use elsewhere. By allowing all of these to be built or legally used, we will quickly add hundreds-of-thousands of affordable apartments.

Prioritize those who need supportive housing the most. New Yorkers in local shelters — especially those who lived in the neighborhood beforehand and were displaced — will be prioritized for supportive housing. So too will young people aging out of foster care, who should be given every chance at starting off adulthood on the right foot."

Source: Candidate website

Curtis Sliwa

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Isaac Wright

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Joycelyn Taylor

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Shaun Donovan

We will make an unprecedented investment in New York City neighborhoods by increasing the supply of affordable housing, equitably and inclusively, across all five boroughs.

As commissioner of the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD), I crafted and carried out the largest and most ambitious affordable housing plan in the nation. He boosted the housing plan from a 65,000-unit program to 165,000 units and spurred the revitalization of neighborhoods that had long struggled to recover from the blight and abandonment of the 1970s and 1980s.

Today, the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated an affordable housing crisis in our city that primarily impacts low-income, underserved communities of color. Prior to the pandemic, these communities were already facing systemic disparities that affected their opportunities for fair and affordable housing and economic growth and prosperity. The economic impacts of COVID-19 are serving to destabilize an already at-risk population, and have shown the need for prioritization to ensure these New Yorkers don’t fall through the cracks.

We are committing to the following policies and programs:

- Expand capital funding for affordable housing

- Ensure regulatory agreements match the public investment and need

- Adopt United for Housing’s recommendation to implement a city-state housing partnership for affordable and supportive housing

- Create good paying jobs for hardworking New Yorkers

- Convert distressed properties into affordable housing

- Implement United for Housing’s recommendation to lead an inter-agency effort to innovate new models, create efficiencies in process, modernize building codes, and streamline approval processes

Maya Wiley

"We need to look for opportunities to expand our affordable housing stock by converting tax liens, buying up properties left behind in the wake of COVID and stimulating more non-profit housing development. With almost half a million people living in public housing– including many workers essential to NYC’s success- we need to prioritize the stabilization and restoration of this critical asset."

"We (also) need to find ways to immediately house people. Approximately 4,000 people are sleeping on the streets on any given night. At the same time, around 100 hotels will likely go bankrupt due to the pandemic. As Mayor, I will explore ways for the city to acquire these properties to convert them into permanently supportive housing."

Source: Candidate website and Open Hearts Initiative questionnaire

Art Chang

I would invest in the largest-scale building of new affordable housing since WWII, by creatively adapting city-owned land. See my answer to #1 above: homelessness and the availability of truly affordable housing are interconnected problems, and by building more affordable housing for low-income New Yorkers, we will drastically lower the amount of homelessness in our City.

I will also commit to ensuring this truly affordable housing is properly taken care of, again, by using transparent, timely, and accurate data. NYCHA housing and its residents need more data, especially now, as countless public housing residents are trapped in their homes during the pandemic in dilapidated apartments. These apartments lack the data to track their decay, and it’s only after the reports reach the hundred-thousands that they are published and reported on. And the problems will only become worse as the data on broken elevators, rundown playgrounds, and lack of heating, trickles in.

Paperboy Prince

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Ray McGuire

From 2001-2008, the city created 2.2 units per new job. By 2018, there were only 0.5 units per new job. If we're going to meet the enormous housing demand, we need to use every tool in the toolkit. As mentioned, I will expand existing affordable housing stock and increase subsidies to focus on housing for low income New Yorkers. Additionally, I will leverage other city assets, namely vacant and underutilized city owned plots of land to build housing that would be within affordable ranges. I also commit to building more senior housing with on-site services. We, however, need to make more resources available to seniors to allow them to age in place and stay in their communities. To increase affordable housing further, we have to look at a citywide process where every community district identifies places to add a percentage of new housing units. I will have Community Boards, local development corps, and community based organizations come up with their own strategy, with the support of city staff. We can use that to inform where we build, but every community must do its part.

Dianne Morales

Besides ensuring that housing is a human right and a starting point for all agencies. I will also appoint a Deputy Mayor responsible for leading and coordinating a citywide, cross-sector effort addressing housing, opportunity and social mobility, including shifting the $3 billion annual shelter budget towards preventative measures, and implementing preventative models that effectively responds to housing displacement and vulnerability.

Kathryn Garcia

Homelessness is a multi-pronged issue but it cannot have a fragmented or haphazard response. I will make a single Deputy Mayor responsible for NYCHA, HPD, DSS, DHS, HRA, DCP, and NYCEDC to align affordable housing and homelessness policy. There are many causes of homelessness, but permanent housing must be at the center of our strategy to end homelessness.

The health portfolio will be under a different Deputy Mayor but will collaborate closely to design and provide services administered by DOH, H+H, DYCD, DFTA, ACS, and others.

Cross-agency collaboration will be managed by creating a HomelessStat approach that brings multiple agencies together to create and retool solutions based on data.

Quanda Francis

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Chris Kreitchman

I feel that the leadership and management structure that is in place is inefficient and outdated. There is a clear and necessary need for a ‘flat’ system that is less hierarchical, where decisions can be made and executed upon. Therefore; Senior leadership and their agencies must be restructured. More importantly, Public Health (& Wellness) must become a department that oversees and interacts with all agencies and subsequent departments, including Senior Management. The style of management must also evolve to today’s standards in the 21st Century. It is clear and prevalent that how our system of governance works here in NYC is antiquated and does not meet the needs of today’s NYC. How we do this is a major undertaking and it starts with establishing new operating systems and procedures, which then give rise to re-educating and re-training, even recruiting new teams and individuals that can meet today’s new standards. From there we grow and work together with a Coalition of Citizens that make up each neighborhood, community, and institutions of NYC to be the bridge between the government and the people. This also serves as a problem identifier as well as a ‘crowdsource-like’ platform to solve problems from the people. I can elaborate on this upon request.

Andrew Yang

Managing government infrastructure must be a top priority to reduce bureaucracy and ensure accountability. That is why as Mayor I will be sure to have in place a senior official who will report directly to me and will have accountability over all agencies that touch homelessness.

Bill Pepitone

Once again, it comes down to a clear structure of leadership. The Deputy Mayor position will oversee inter-agency collaboration and ensure direct communication between homeless services and housing operations. Every agency that is involved in the process (Homeless Services, NYPD, BOE, ACS)will report to the Deputy Mayor and their staff. We must eliminate the obstacles and the administrative red tape in order to succeed and end this crisis.

Scott Stringer

Tackling homelessness will be a multi-agency priority when I am mayor, and that’s a message that will be sent on Day 1. One of the main reasons we have such a severe homelessness crisis today is because the City has for too long taken a siloed approach to managing the challenge, leaving it mainly up to DHS to provide shelter. But that’s the wrong approach.

We need to recognize that the root causes of homelessness are varied, and that the best way to combat homelessness is by preventing it in the first place. We need to recognize that individuals do not only enter the shelter system by eviction—many enter after being in a hospital, a correctional facility, or other social service entity. Each time a City agency or institution interacts with a person, it is a chance to stop homelessness before it starts with an integrated, citywide approach. However, only DHS is graded in the Mayor’s Management Report on whether it is taking steps to reduce homelessness. As Mayor, I will hold all agencies and institutions accountable for proactively intervening before individuals enter the shelter system.

I will also involve advocates and those with lived experience of homelessness in developing strategies -- as I have in the past. When I was Manhattan Borough President, my office partnered in 2007 with Picture the Homeless to count every vacant lot and building in Northern Manhattan. More than 150 volunteers hit the streets to walk every block, and by the end of the process we had counted over 1,700 abandoned buildings and 500 vacant lots. That work continues to inform my thinking around city-owned vacant lots and the role they could play in helping to build a new generation of social housing.

Fernando Mateo

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Aaron Foldenauer

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Eric Adams

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Curtis Sliwa

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Isaac Wright

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Joycelyn Taylor

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Shaun Donovan

We agree with the United 4 Housing recommendation of consolidating housing and homeless program into one deputy mayor.

The financing and construction of new affordable housing and the preservation of existing affordable housing can require the work of multiple city agencies, including HPD, HDC, DOB, EDC, DOHMH, DHS, etc., and some one may not consider but may be required for permitting, like DOT, FDNY, DEP, and others. We will engage stakeholders to develop a strategy to streamline approvals and interactions between agencies, with the goal of reducing the average affordable housing construction timeline by 20% while maintaining all necessary safety standards.

We will also reduce hard costs in affordable housing construction by 20% percent while maintaining all necessary safety standards, by allowing innovative forms of project delivery, expanding allowed materials in construction, and reviewing labor requirements. By reviewing ballooning site insurance costs and other insurance costs, reviewing HDC financing fees for possible savings, and applying other similar strategies, we will identify extraordinary soft costs that can be reduced through exemptions or alternatives.

Maya Wiley

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Art Chang

All of our City’s problems are interconnected, and recognizing that is essential to solving them. I care deeply about modernizing government with better technology, better management practices, and better performance metrics. I have worked in and around government for most of my career, and I’m no stranger to the difficulty of implementing these ideas effectively. I will simply commit to living and breathing efficient, decisive, modern government that puts public well-being first.

I will swiftly address the dysfunction of the city government by restoring civilian control over broken and rogue organizations by re-establishing control over the budget. With my background in the tech industry, I know how to bring our city’s technological infrastructure into the 21st Century -- making our government work for the people more accessibly and effectively.

In order to establish a healthy organizational culture, modeling a healthy, collaborative, inclusive management approach is essential. To achieve this, I will organize cross-agency efforts via an Operating Committee for the City, with offices such as:

Deputy Mayor for Operations and Finance - COO for the City

Deputy Mayor for Safe & Healthy Communities

Deputy Mayor for Opportunity - DOE, CUNY and Workforce Development

Deputy Mayor for an Affordable City, focusing on Affordable Housing

Deputy Mayor for Climate

Deputy Mayor for Economic Growth

Deputy Mayor for Technology - CIO for the City

Deputy Mayor for Diversity, Inclusion and Communities

Municipal Labor Committee representatives

Paperboy Prince

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Ray McGuire

Although I am not yet settled on the precise structure, my administration will prioritize these issues by creating a comprehensive plan that spans different departments and agencies to address the holistic nature of homelessness. What’s ultimately important is that the mayor has the leadership and management experience to drive outcomes when it comes to housing, homelessness, and health and exhibits the leadership to hold themselves accountable for getting it done–and that’s exactly what I promise to do.

Dianne Morales

As Mayor, I will use a performance-based approach to many different kinds of contracts, including contracts with service providers to encourage the outcomes we want - placing and keeping people in permanent housing. A simple contract change won’t end homelessness by itself - that requires the right level of rental assistance and creating and preserving deeply affordable housing - but it focuses service providers on the outcome we want and starts to break the cycle of dependence on shelters.

Kathryn Garcia

As Mayor, I will use a performance-based approach to many different kinds of contracts, including contracts with service providers to encourage the outcomes we want - placing and keeping people in permanent housing. A simple contract change won’t end homelessness by itself - that requires the right level of rental assistance and creating and preserving deeply affordable housing - but it focuses service providers on the outcome we want and starts to break the cycle of dependence on shelters.

Quanda Francis

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Chris Kreitchman

As Mayor, I will absolutely use all the tools available, especially in unconventional ways to investigate, identify, expose, and correct any inconsistencies that may exist that prevent, delay, confuse, or negatively influence any ability of any New Yorker to have access to affordable housing, resources to avoid homelessness as well as leave the shelter system for long-term housing stability. There is a lot of work to do around these problems that plague our city’s institutions, and New Yorkers suffer through displacement and many other subsequent problems. This should have never been allowed and been correctly established from the formation on day one, but we now know better and will have a better living experience for all New Yorkers. We must be able to crack down on property developers and landlords from gaming and cheating the system, because New York City suffers in the long term. We cannot and will not lose more New Yorkers and its character that they give to NYC that makes this town so unique. I pledge my word to fight all forms of crime, especially corruption.

Andrew Yang

Those organizations that provide shelter would be given specific goals with timelines on obtaining jobs and securing housing for their clients. The average length of stay in all of our shelters has greatly increased and this trend must be reversed. Providers that don’t meet these agreed upon goals will be held accountable.

Bill Pepitone

The goal, as stated before, is to end homelessness by concentrating on long term housing stability. We will do this by utilizing every tool available and every agency that is involved in the process. However, it truly comes down to the counseling services we provide initially. Supporting individuals and families BEFORE they become displaced or homeless is the key. If we are proactive in this approach, if we invest in those service providers, we can finally have a legitimate impact.

Scott Stringer

If we’re going to tackle the homelessness crisis, then we must invest in results. We need to take a full review of relevant social service contracts to ensure that they are aligned with our goal of ending and preventing homelessness. For example, we should ensure that social services that support New Yorkers do not disincentivize permanent housing and create a self-fulfilling prophecy of furthering housing instability, but link New Yorkers to stable longer-term supports. We also need to ensure that contracts are geared toward lowering the overall need for services, and that service providers are accountable to outcomes and rewarded for helping New Yorkers out of homelessness. To do this, the City must work with providers to reform the procurement and contracting process so service providers on the frontlines of our homelessness crises actually get paid on time (an issue my office has investigated and pushed the City on) and pilot new contracts that center outcomes.

Fernando Mateo

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Aaron Foldenauer

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Eric Adams

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Curtis Sliwa

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Isaac Wright

RxHome has used the candidate’s website and public remarks to provide responses, where appropriate and accurate, to the questions listed in our candidate questionnaire. We could not find corresponding information to answer this question.

Joycelyn Taylor

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Shaun Donovan

As I’ve explained throughout, homelessness is a solvable problem. We cannot accept the status quo nor solve homelessness with homeless programs alone. I will work with every tool to accomplish this. We will spend smarter, moving our city from a right to shelter towards a right to housing, ensuring that all New Yorkers have access to the housing support they need.

Maya Wiley

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Art Chang

The City must re-align with service providers. Today, they’re treated as vendors regardless of the form of service or tax status. In my administration, non-profit service providers would be treated as valuable partners. We need to re-orient our priorities to proactive, predictive, collaborative services.

Paperboy Prince

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Ray McGuire

As mayor, I will expand rental assistance to serve more New Yorkers and ensure that vouchers cover the actual cost of housing in New York City. One of my key metrics will be reducing the number of individuals entering the shelter system in the first place, and dramatically reducing the amount of time individuals spend in shelter. I will hold both city agency staff and shelter operators accountable for more quickly helping individuals experiencing homelessness access permanent housing, including supportive housing if needed. I will look at existing housing stock to determine where vouchers and rental subsidies can help place people transitioning from other government institutions such as the prison system, foster care, and hospitalization. As mentioned, I will keep those with a place to stay in their homes by providing rental subsidies, legal assistance, and advocating for additional section 8 vouchers from the federal government.